June 28th, 2005

Have you heard the one about the gay teen concentration camp?

In Tenessee, they don’t bother to beat the shit out of gay teens and leave them for dead on fences.

No, at the hideously named Love In Action camp they just outsource the killing to the gay teens themselves. Quoth the head of the “conversion camp”:

“I would rather you commit suicide than have you leave Love In Action wanting to return to the gay lifestyle. In a physical death you could still have a spiritual resurrection; whereas, returning to homosexuality you are yielding yourself to a spiritual death from which there is no recovery.”

Think about that every time you hear Bush talk about the Culture of Life. The fundagelical puppetmasters who got him elected wave around their pretty talking points, but they have raised up in this land of Cult of Death around those they scapegoat for power and profit. When will we tear it down?

I wish evil on few people. But the people who say things like that, and the self-righteous fucks who turn their children over to such idiots deserve the very worst this world has to offer. This world and the next one, come to think of it.

Seriously, don’t read that last link unless you want to be sitting at your desk at work sobbing with rage. Though “Zack’s” case has become a cause celebre, nothing could ever heal what has been done to him. And despite an investigation, the state of Tennessee isn’t taking any action to regulate this or other gay-teen gulags.

Update: The complete rules of the LIA(r) program are here, and they are seriously so fucked up that it’s a wonder that every single “client” doesn’t kill themselves. If ever there were a doubt that the “ex-gay movement” is a cult, this should settle the argument. LIA exhibits the unintentional hilarity shared by all cults:

6. No television viewing, going to movies, or reading/watching/listening to secular media of any kind, anywhere within the clients and the parent’s/guardian’s control. This includes listening to classical or instrumental music that is not expressly Christian (Beethoven, Bach, etc. are not considered Christian). The only exception to the media policy is the weekly movie.

Oh, and the camp is run by “ex-gays” who I’m guessing are the most twisted individuals this side of a pretzel factory. Running a camp like this, where the “clients” aren’t allowed to talk to anyone but their family–and then never about the program–must be a great way to secretly indulge their sadistic pedophiliac urges. Running one of these camps must be even better than being a Roman Catholic priest!

One Response to “Have you heard the one about the gay teen concentration camp?”

  1. terry says:

    The industry around the “we’ll make your teen more manageable” camps is one that I find really disturbing and has been around for a very long time. If you have ever looked in the back of a Sunset magazine and read some of the ads, you have been nauseous over the thinly veiled promises of making your teen a properly conformed little automaton who will obey your and society’s rules at all times.

    Now having been what in the kindest of terms would be called a “wild” teenager, I am one of the lucky ones that was allowed to come to my senses within a family of frustrated but loving and supportive parents. I feel for the minority that are sent off to a program that is geared to break the will and stifle the imagination while force feeding guilt and shame down their captive throats.

    This is one area where I feel children should be able to fight back. In this and many other states at the age of 13 a child has the ability to block their parents from accessing their mental and physical health records. I think 13 year olds should have the right to refuse “treatment” and select a medical advocate, be that a psychiatrist or physician that will consider the child’s desires and symptoms, if any, independent of the parents’ desires and opinions. It is a sad but all too real fact that some children need to be protected from their parents and I believe that it is the government’s responsibility to provide access to that protection should the child feel s/he needs it.