Welcome to Atwood, Kansas

Here’s a sobering example of what happens when you allow bigotry to become law. Atwood, Kansas, population 1242 (and declining), voted 984 to 113 to change the state’s constitution so that “no relationship, other than a marriage, shall be recognized by the state as entitling the parties to the rights or incidents of marriage”. Daniel, former publisher of the town’s website and on-line newspaper site, expresses his anguish in this
open letter, which replaces the town’s website.

5 thoughts on “Welcome to Atwood, Kansas”

  1. The letter’s gone now, 4/13, just one day afer your post, David. When I click on your link, all I get is an announcement that things are under construction at the town’s website. I clicked through to Atwood & editorials, but all that’s there are bland op-eds headlined “We Should Take Care of Our Weeds” and “Parents Appreciate Music Teacher.”

  2. I too am from Atwood and am getting quite tired of seeing this posted all over the internet. Everyone acts as if Daniel was personally attacked. I, for one had no idea we had a gay man running the website, and I’m pretty sure that goes for the vast majority of Atwood’s citizens. No one was trying to single him out. They were merely expressing the conservative, family-oriented beliefs prevalent in the area.

    You all say everyone should have the right to marry or at least have the rights that go along with such a union. I disagree, but I completely respect your right to your opinion, and your right to vote as you see fit. Do the rest of us not deserve that right simply because we didn’t vote the way you wanted?

    Also, to Daniel: You clearly don’t know the town you claim to love and hoped to help save very well, or you would not have been surprised by the outcome of the vote.

  3. You all say everyone should have the right to marry or at least have the rights that go along with such a union. I disagree, but I completely respect your right to your opinion, and your right to vote as you see fit. Do the rest of us not deserve that right simply because we didn’t vote the way you wanted?

    You know a lot of people were against miscegenation, too. They felt that they should be able to deny the rights of couples because they were of different races. You see, your opinion and the way you vote is your business. When you seek to impose your personal/religious beliefs upon people and the outcome of that is to deny them civil and economic rights that others enjoy as citizens of the United States then everyone becomes involved. Because, you see, all of us are equal before the law with no one person or group having privelege above another.

    If you want to live in a land where religious beliefs trump the rule of law, then I suggest that you investigate moving somewhere abroad.

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